A look at the Arkansas Drought from the cattle pasture


View this post on CNN’s Eatocracy – Praying for rain in the Arkansas drought

This year’s drought has been rough across much of the country. All year, my dad has been telling me of the dry conditions in Arkansas, how the first hay crop didn’t make, and now how many farmers are selling their cattle herds because there is no hay or grass to feed the livestock. The recent heat wave only intensified the situation, drying up ponds, pastures, and leaving many trees to start shedding leaves early. I haven’t had the opportunity for a trip home, but I can only imagine how rough it is.

Fires have been breaking out across Arkansas, keeping many on edge and fire fighters busy containing the flames. Over the past week, some spotty showers have popped up daily, but it isn’t enough to ease the situation. The July 10th drought monitor update shows that the area of Extreme Drought doubled in one week to 71% of the state and Exceptional drought is creeping in, jumping to 3.25% in one week. Now over 80% of the lower 48 states are affected by abnormally dry or drought conditions.

July 10th Drought monitor update shows Arkansas drought intensifying depsite recent spotty showers

Like many others across the state, my family’s cattle auction in Searcy, AR is seeing head counts well above norms runs for summer months. My father and I shared this story recently on DTN. Our auction would normally run 400-500 head weekly during the summer months, but the past two auctions have been 1,400 and 1,100 head of cattle. Here’s the most recent market report. Local news stations and nationally NBC News have reported on the drought conditions in Arkansas.

But what does the Arkansas drought really look like from the pasture? My parents sent me a few photos over the weekend. The best I can describe the pastures I grew up on is by comparing them to the arid regions on the Western States.

Many ponds are getting dangerously low. This could cause concern for debris and unclean water for livestock

Many trees have started shedding leaves. Some like these are bare.

My dad has been feeding cattle hay for some time now. Nothing else for them to eat.

Not really much ya can do for the grass til it rains

The spotty showers are nice if one pops up over your place, but what folks really need in drought stricken areas is a few weeks of slow, steady rain, followed by a return to normal patterns. Unfortunately, that’s not what the forecast predicts. Until then, just pray for rain.

Follow updates for the drought across the country on Social Media through the Twitter hashtags #drought, #drought12, and see how it’s affecting farmers and ranchers on the #agchat and #ranchlife hashtags.

Enhanced by Zemanta
About these ads
About Ryan Goodman (994 Articles)
Ryan Goodman lives in Helena, MT and comes from an Arkansas cattle ranching family. Since growing up on a family cow/calf and stocker-calf operation, he has spent the last several years learning about farming systems across the country. A graduate of Oklahoma State, Ryan is currently working on a Master's degree from the University of Tennessee. He works continuously to share his story of ranch life through community outreach and social media, all while encouraging others in agriculture to do the same.

3 Comments on A look at the Arkansas Drought from the cattle pasture

  1. We were blessed with a few squalls…wish we could send some there.

    Like

  2. The corn in Western Nebraska is gone, even under pivots it’s stressing. Here in Eastern Nebraska we have few pivots and although the corn is 7 ft tall (ahead of schedule) it’s starting to burn up now. No rain in site for the entire week with temps at 100F. Not good.

    Like

  3. California has been suffering drought conditions for several years, sad but it seems the rest of the country is now experiencing it too. Good pasture management and reducing herd size have been top priority for many throughout the State. I am fortunate to have generations of expertise and detailed records from as far back as my great-great grandfather, it appears we are experiencing similar to the same weather and conditions that led to the Dust Bowl. To me this is were farmers and ranchers show their skills…

    Like

1 Trackbacks & Pingbacks

  1. Drought 2012: Thirsty for Rain « From Heels to Boots

Share Your Thoughts

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 11,629 other followers

%d bloggers like this: