The Wide World of Oregon Agriculture.


Banditas are back!
Banditas are back!

Marie BowersBandita Marie Bowers is a 5th generation grass seed farmer in Harrisburg, OR farming land that has been in her family for over a hundred years. Prior to returning to the family farm she graduated from Washington State University with degrees in Agriculture and Agriculture Economics and Management then spent 3 years in the Farm Credit System.  She currently serves as Oregon Women for Agriculture President and Oregon Women for Agriculture Legislative Chair.  She is also a board member of the AgChat Foundation, which helps to empower farmers and ranchers through social media. Connect with her on twitter: @MarieB41 or on her blog oregongreen.wordpress.com

In my ever so humble opinion, Oregon is the prettiest state in the union.  You have four different climates & topographies; coast, valley, mountains and desert.   When these diverse regions are combined the result is over 220 different commodities or a colorful variety of food and fiber products some unique only to Oregon.

Land of Fruits & Nuts Interpret how you want 😉

If have you eaten US grown blackberries, boysenberries, loganberries, black raspberries or hazelnuts recently there’s a very likely chance they came from Oregon.  According to 2011 statistics, 100% of those crops are produced in the Beaver State.

Where the Green Grass Grows

Our farm is not blessed with the type of soil that allows us to grow nuts and fruits, however it is suitable for growing grass seed.  In fact, I happen to live in the ‘Grass Seed Capital of the World’.  Oregon’s Willamette Valley produces the majority of the world’s cool season grasses, mainly fescue and ryegrass.  This seed is shipped all around the world for pastures, erosion control, cover crops and lawns.  To see how grass seed is harvested check it out here.

My home county, Linn County, produces the majority of the world’s annual ryegrass, often used for pastures/forage, cover crops and erosion control.
My home county, Linn County, produces the majority of the world’s annual ryegrass, often used for pastures/forage, cover crops and erosion control.

‘Tis the season

Oregon wins at Christmas.  We lead the nation in Christmas tree and peppermint production.  While I don’t get overly enthused about the holiday season, I do love the smell of the trees and peppermint schnapps in my cocoa. 😉

To learn more about the impact  of Oregon’s awesome farms and ranches check out here.

Oregon Agriculture

Advertisements

5 Comments

  1. I love this post for so many reasons. I remember talking to you about how grass seed is raised and harvested, when we grabbed food at the Denver airport. My mind is still blown, and it’s a great reminder that EVERYTHING has to be grown SOMEWHERE.

    Great post!

    Like

Share Your Thoughts

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s