Visit to an Organic Farm in Minnesota Teaches Flat Ryan a Few Things


Minnesota farmer & blogger Carolyn Olson volunteered to get Flat Ryan out on their farm and it just so happened, that Ryan got to check out planting some cover crops! Carolyn and her husband, Jonathan raise organic crops and conventional pigs on their century farm. Carolyn is active in Farm Bureau, and is a member of the Minnesota Department of Agriculture’s Organic Advisory Task Force (is it bad to mention that I was appointed chair?). Jonathan and Carolyn have three daughters, who are all attending college. In her spare time, Carolyn bakes breakfast treats for the local Farmer’s Market. She blogs regularly at Carolyn Cares and can be found discussing it on a variety of platforms including Twitter as Westacre2CJ

On the last day of August, #FlatRyan got in on a little cover crop planting on our farm. Saturday was pretty warm for Minnesota standards, but it was a good day to get some work done.  We do things a little differently than most of our neighbors, which sometimes leads to many questions. We farm organic row crops, so we follow different rules. One of those rules is a three crop rotation.  Each year, we have approximately one-third field corn, one-third soybeans, and one-third small grain (wheat, and a mix of barley & field peas).  We use cover cropping to help lock in nutrients, for weed control, and to prevent soil erosion.

The field we were working in had been a barley and field pea field.  The barley and peas had been harvested, the straw baled, and manure applied for next year’s corn crop.  The manure was worked into the soil with a deep till chisel plow before we seeded oats with a broadcast spreader. The oats were worked in with the field cultivator, which was set to go only an inch or two deep.  We were then ready to try something we’ve never done before.

#FlatRyan, Pongo the Rat Terrier, and I took the Ranger across the road to check in with Jonathan and see how he was doing.

Flat Ryan Meets a friend

TillageRadish carolyncares

We have been seeding Tillage Radish with our oats for a few years. Tillage Radish is different from the radishes you grow in your garden. A Tillage Radish has a pretty strong tap root that can break up compacted layers in the soil. The root keeps nutrients locked up over the winter, and when the plant dies, it leaves a hole the size of the radish that the corn plant’s roots will be able to use to grow bigger.

Last year, we attended a cover cropping seminar, and heard about a study that was being done where they planted the Tillage Radish seed with the corn planter, using sugar beet plates.  To us, it made total sense. Using GPS mapping in the tractor, we have the capability of planting the corn directly over the rows that we planted the Tillage Radish in. We weren’t sure exactly how well it would work, or if the Precision Planting system would be able to accurately measure how many seeds per acre we were planting.  This is where #FlatRyan joined us.

FlatRyan2 carolyncaresWhen Jonathan got to the end, we needed to check the planter boxes to see if he was planting the correct number of seeds per acre.  Here, #FlatRyan is looking to see how much seed is left in the first box.

It was decided that Jonathan needed more seed, so #FlatRyan, Pongo, and I headed to the seed shed in the yard. Many of our bags are white with no markings, so reading a seed tag is important. Tillage Radish comes in colorful bags, so they were easy to spot.

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We loaded a couple of bags into the back of the Ranger, and went back across the road to meet the planter once again.

FlatRyan4 carolyncares

Jonathan split the 50 pounds of seed between the 16 boxes, and we put the other bag in the rock box. We still weren’t sure how much would be needed to finish this field. #FlatRyan was so excited by how well the planter was working to plant the radish seeds that he was kicking up his heels!

FlatRyan5 carolyncares

Not long after Jonathan finished planting this field, the clouds rolled in, and we were blessed with ½ inch of rain!

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radish seedling carolyncaresThis is how the field looked 10 days after we planted the Tillage Radish. Looks like both the oats and the radish are off to a good start!

After #FlatRyan’s weekend with us, Jonathan and I seeded and planted our wheat fields the same way. In the last field, we planted 46 acres of Tillage Radish like we did in the barley and pea field. We were racing with the rain on the last day, so we decided to broadcast seed the oats and Tillage Radish on the remaining 100 acres. Then, for good measure, we left about 8 acres as a check strip. That way, we have all three methods in one field.  Next spring we will till the field with the field cultivator, which will disturb the decayed matter and small weeds on the surface, but will preserve the channels created by the Tillage Radish.

We hope #FlatRyan had fun helping us with our experiment! This is one experiment that will take a long time to see the results, but in the meantime, it does keep the neighbors guessing about what we’re up to!

You can read more of the posts in the Flat Ryan series here and don’t forget, if you would like to share information about your part of agriculture, Flat Ryan loves ag facts and new experiences

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11 Comments

  1. Janice, what a great article. And I laugh every time I see Flat Ryan. I do believe in the first picture, Pongo the dog is gonna get a little personal there with FR, haha.
    Really interesting stuff — I had no clue about tillage radish. Thanks!!

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    1. I’m a big advocate for all types of farming. I think most farmers are doing what they feel is best for the land they have, the community they serve, etc. Some just have different production practices to help them meet that goal. The only kind of farms I don’t advocate for are the really rare ones that are mismanaged or that throw others under the bus. Luckily they are really rare and I can celebrate the vast majority of farms I see and farmers I get to know!

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      1. Im just in the process of converting 220 acres into organics. Next year will be my first year of the required 3 yr. certification. Carolyn and Jon Olson appear to have it dialed in. Do you know if they let me visit their farm?
        Mike Hill

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    2. Thank you! We have found a good farming system that works for us and for our land. We do pay attention to wildlife and soil conservation, as do most farmers in our area. Many of our neighbors are also sportsmen, so healthy waters and conservation lands are a priority to them.

      Like

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